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The Nun Fails To Scare Us

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If you have seen the movie ‘Godzilla’ you would have an idea of how the actual character Godzilla was largely unavailable during the entire movie. The same is the case for our latest horror flick: The Nun. Ideally, a scare-free expansion of the Conjuring universe, The Nun disappoints on several levels. The film delivers much less scares than it claimed it would, unless of course if you are have a genuine phobia of nuns because there are an awful lot of nuns running around.

The Cast

The film which premiered on Friday, September 7th, 2018 is directed by Corin Hardy. The Nun features Taissa Farmiga, Demian Bichir, Jonas Bloquet, Bonnie Aarons, Charlotte Hope, Michael Smiley, Ingrid Bisu, Sandra Teles, August Maturo, Jack Falk, and Lynnette Gaza, in its star cast, and has been written by Gary Dauberman and James Wan. Set against a 1952 Gothic Romania, the gothic supernatural horror film by Warner Bros. Pictures has been subject to both critical acclaim and scorn. There is general praise for performances but seething contempt against the poor execution of the script.

Taissa Farmiga is just as divine as her character. It is as if the nature has modeled her for horror. Her fear and emotions are nearly tangible, and she easily draws her audience into sensations not different from her character’s. Farmiga has a natural sense of insecurity which is often shrouded by the immense hope in her psyche, and this blends perfectly well with the plot. With reflexes such apt for horror, we cannot wait to see her perform in an actual horror movie.

The cast maintains a perfect balance in performances. Father Burke (Demián Bichir) clerically fills the narration in the most priest-like manner, and Frenchie (Jonas Bloquet) incredible comic timing forestall the story’s gravitas from taking a toll on the audience. Vivacity breaches the scripts serious tone with Bloquet’s character in certainly the most commendable fashion.

Story-line

The standard issue with the Conjuring Universe is the lack of reason, and The Nun does not, even a bit, try to resolve this issue. “What do you want sister?” Is one question we can surely ask the unholy soul, who only rarely appears during the course of the film. Makers have for sure employed every legerdemain from the Horror Story rule book: the self-operating radios, precipitate curdling voice-overs, disbanded silhouettes with no references, walking through walls, wrecked holy ornaments, poorly lit abyss, senseless momentary screams and shrieks. The monotony manifests itself; their is improvising, but no invention.

Technical effects are dazzling.The technology input makes the picture authentic. The VFX are free from imperfections, so what we see appears very real. However, visual effects cannot really mask a shoddy implementation of the storyline. A desperate reminder that merchandising evil inescapably remits the same.

The talkie’s opening scene, where we see a young nun has hung herself in front of St. Carta’s façade, optimizes an intriguing story. A French-Canadian farmer discovers the body, and calls upon Vatican’s badass priest, and his progressive neophyte to investigate the matter. The three venture to the abbey where they would split up at the first hint of danger. For most of the time they saunter around holding lanterns in their hands, while ghastly ghouls run around in the most disorderly manner. The best they are capable of is rattling furniture.

A story just as drab as the movie ambience, and the fear it evokes is less than what it was supposed to. Obsession for darkness is meaningful in horror movies, but it’s mostly overdone here.
In summary, the sister does not scare. There are frequent jump scares, even more a lack of horrific elements. It will disappoint even if you liked Annabelle or The Conjuring.

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